Tag: Chasen Shreve

Yankees Acquire Luke Voit, International Bonus Cash From Cardinals for Gallegos/Shreve

The Yankees made a move Saturday night that satisfied three objectives:

  1. Cleared roster space for J.A. Happ
  2. Acquired a righty depth bat in Aaron Judge‘s absence
  3. Added more cash to their international bonus pool

They traded much-maligned lefty Chasen Shreve and 40-man roster occupying longman Giovanny Gallegos to the St. Louis Cardinals in exchange for first baseman Luke Voit and international signing bonus pool money.

Voit, a 27-year-old drafted by the Cardinals in the 22nd round of the 2013 draft, is batting .299/.391/.500 in 67 Triple-A games for the Memphis Redbirds of the Pacific Coast League (I omitted his two Double-A games since I believe he was optioned there out of convenience – STL’s Double-A franchise is in Springfield, Missouri). He spends the majority of his defensive appearances at first base (471⅔ innings for Memphis) but has also played one game in left field. He started 43 games as a catcher in 2013 once drafted in the New York-Penn League but has not appeared there since.

I think Brian Cashman has something else up his sleeve because the acquisition of Voit gives Bobby Mitchell, SWB’s manager, three primary first baseman since Tyler Austin and Mike Ford are there as well. It makes one of them expendable, and the platoon difference between Austin and Ford imply that the former is expendable. Time will tell.


The Yankees were likely going to designate one of Gallegos or Shreve for assignment to get Happ onto the roster. They wanted to get something for two pitchers who also would’ve been jettisoned in the upcoming 40-man roster crunch this offseason.

Shreve was emotional after receiving the news, having been with the team since 2015. He posted a 3.92 ERA in 180 appearances with the Yankees. He was incredible in 2015, with a 3.09 mark across 58⅓ innings. He struggled to replicate it going forward, coming closest with a 3.77 ERA in 2017. He was out of options, and pitched as a long-man in 2018 (with a 4.26 ERA).

Gallegos has two minor league options left, so he has some value to the Cardinals. In four big-league appearances in 2018, he has a 4.50 ERA. Across his whole career, he has a 4.75 ERA in 20 games. This season in Triple-A, he has a 3.90 ERA in 17 games and 27⅔ innings.

Royals 2, Yankees 7: Injury Concerns Cloud Series-Opening Win

THE BRONX – On a day where the Yankees consummated a trade for a high-profile starting pitcher and scored seven runs to win a game, the focus sits on injury concerns with Aaron Judge and Sonny Gray.

Judge started as the designated hitter today, but was drilled in the vicinity of his right wrist on a 2-2 pitch from Jakob Junis. He stayed in the game to run the bases, and also recorded an infield single in his second at-bat. However, Miguel Andújar came in to pinch-hit for him once the No. 2 spot in the order came up again.

In the fifth inning, Alex Gordon hit a hard ground ball up the middle that Gray slowed down with his pitching hand. The trainers came out to check on him, and after a few warm-up pitches, he stayed in the game to finish the fifth inning. His velocity was down a few ticks at this point, but he managed to get out of the inning with no runs allowed. Undoubtedly, Gray would have continued to pitch since he was removed with only 75 pitches but the Yankees figured it was not worth the risk since they were up by seven runs at that point.

The Yankees scored early and often, pushing across two in the first inning on a Giancarlo Stanton sacrifice fly and later a fielding error hit into by Gleyber Torres. The Yankees got four in the fourth, thanks to an RBI double by Austin Romine and a three-run (all unearned) home run by Didi Gregorius. Didi only got to hit because Andújar reached on a brutal error by Royals’ shortstop Adalberto Mondesí. Greg Bird hit a sacrifice fly in the fifth inning for the Yankees’ seventh and final run.

The Royals scored their two runs once Gray was lifted for Adam Warren. Mike Moustakas hit his first pitch for a ground-rule double, and then two pitches later, Salvador Pérez took him deep to center for a two-run shot.

Things got hairy for Chasen Shreve in the ninth. He came on in relief of Zach Britton, who threw a 1-2-3 inning in his Yankees debut. Jorge Bonifacio singled, and then was replaced by Alex Gordon on a forceout. After striking out Brian Goodwin, Mondesí recorded a single that got Aroldis Chapman loose in the Yankees bullpen. Whit Merrifield followed with a single to center, but Gordon barreled through Mike Jirschele‘s stop sign at third base. Aaron Hicks fired to Romine at the plate and Gordon was out to end the game.

Yankees “Heavy” on Zach Britton; Other Teams Still In On Lefty

It seems there’s no dominant starting pitcher available on the market, so the Yankees are looking to shore up an already dominant bullpen.

Multiple MLB insiders reported today that the Yankees are “heavy” in their pursuit of Baltimore Orioles closer Zach Britton, with that adjective coming from SNY’s Andy Martino. MLB Network’s Jim Bowden said the Yankees are in the lead along with the Houston Astros, and stated “negotiations are rounding third and heading for home.”

Bowden also noted that the Astros and Yankees were not alone, and his MLB Network colleague Ken Rosenthal reported that he heard the Milwaukee Brewers and Boston Red Sox are also involved.

Britton would fill the role of the non-Aroldis Chapman lefty out of the Yankees bullpen. Since becoming a full-time reliever in 2014, lefties hit just .182/.242/.232 off of him in a 290-batter sample size. Plus, his experience in high-leverage situations would be valuable down the stretch.

The Yankees have been linked to Britton at various points this trade season, as well as now-Cleveland lefty Brad Hand. Rosenthal reported the Yankees had been in touch with the Padres about Hand, but that the Friars wanted Miguel Andújar in any trade for Hand. They ended up accepting one prospect (albeit a good one – Francisco Mejía) for Hand and Adam Cimber, who combined have like eight more years of control. Another example of teams demanding an overpay from the Yankees, but I digress.

Adding Britton to the Yankees bullpen would be an obvious upgrade not just over Chasen Shreve, but would also add another formidable arm to an already-scary bullpen down the stretch.

Yankees 8, Blue Jays 5: Happ Fails Audition

In what was billed by many to be a trade audition for Blue Jays lefty J.A. Happ for the Yankees, the offense ended up starring.

Happ surrendered back-to-back home runs to the game’s first batters, as Brett Gardner and Aaron Judge greeted him rudely to give the Yankees a quick 2-to-0 advantage. Happ then walked Giancarlo Stanton and Aaron Hicks. He managed to strike out Didi Gregorius and Miguel Andújar before allowing a 2-run double to Brandon Drury that just squirted over the head of a leaping Kevin Pillar.

Pillar would exact his revenge in the bottom the second off Luis Severino. After Justin Smoak led off the inning with a single, Pillar ripped a hanging slider over the left field wall for a two-run home run.

The Yankees got back into the scoring column in the following frame. Didi led off with a walk, but the next two hitters failed to advance him into scoring position. The second of which was Kyle Higashioka, who was called out on strikes with an absolutely glacial call by home-plate umpire Lance Barrett. CC Sabathia began to chirp from the dugout, and Barrett was having none of it. He warned Sabathia but gave him approximately three more words before tossing him from the dugout. Aaron Boone came out and attempted to smooth things over but it was clear Sabathia was the victim of a quick trigger.

With the ejection dealt with, Happ then walked Greg Bird. On his way to remove Happ, Jays manager John Gibbons had some words with Barrett. As Jake Petricka began his warmups, Gibbons himself took exception to some of Barrett’s decisions with the strike zone and got himself run as well. The second pitch Petricka threw ended up being rocked into the gap for a two-run triple by Gardner. The Yankee left fielder then scored on a passed ball by Luke Maile, which came on a 97 mph two-seam fastball.

In the bottom of the fourth, Randal Grichuk tagged Severino for a solo shot, marking the first time this season that the Yankees right-hander allowed more than one home run in a single game. The Jays scored again on a sacrifice fly by Pillar in the sixth, and on a garbage time Aledmys Díaz home run in the ninth off Chasen Shreve (more on this debacle later).

The Yankees became concerned in the fifth inning as center fielder Aaron Hicks was replaced in the outfield by Clint Frazier in left, with Gardner moving over to center field. The cause of this was revealed after the game as cramping in his left leg. Hicks should not have any lingering injury but will sit Sunday’s game as a precaution.

In the Yankees’ half of the ninth, Andújar smoked a double (measured at 109.6 mph) to leadoff the inning. Gregorius then followed by poking a single to left to push Andújar across as the final insurance run.

Aroldis Chapman was brought in to record the final three outs of the game, though it was a non-save situation. He only made it through six pitches, when he pulled up lame on his left leg after striking out Grichuk. Boone removed Chapman, who felt soreness in his left knee because of tendinitis that he has been dealing with all season. Shreve, who would have entered the game had the Yankees created a bigger advantage, was summoned to the mound. He worked a ground out from Maile and allowed Díaz’s eighth home run of the season before striking out pinch-hitter Teoscar Hernández to end the game.

Severino was due for an outing where he did not have his best stuff, but luckily the Yankees’ offense was ready to bail him out. The team is now hoping the injury scares for Chapman and Hicks prove to be minor. They now must play nine games in eight days in three cities before the All-Star Break arrives July 16.

What’s Next

Domingo Germán gets the nod in the series finale against the Jays and lefty Ryan Borucki.

This game was the subject of a conflict between the Yankees organization and ESPN, as the latter wanted to televise the game at 8:05 p.m. as their Sunday Night Baseball game of the week. With a doubleheader scheduled the following day in Baltimore, the Yankees cried foul, and even threatened to strip ESPN reporters of their clubhouse credentials. The network later relented, and moved the game into a 1:05 p.m. start time. The national spotlight will now be on the Los Angeles Dodgers and Los Angeles Angels Sunday night at 8 p.m. Eastern Time.

Aroldis Chapman Pulled in Ninth Inning with Apparent Leg Injury

Aroldis Chapman was removed from Saturday afternoon’s game against the Blue Jays after throwing his sixth pitch of the day.

Chapman struck out Randal Grichuk, but immediately limped after landing once the pitch was released. It appeared to be his left leg that was giving him discomfort. He was replaced by Chasen Shreve, who had been warming up alongside Chapman during the top of the ninth inning.

The YES Network broadcasting team mentioned that Chapman has managed to tendinitis in his left knee throughout his career, though it’s unclear if his left knee was giving him trouble.

Chapman is 3-0 with a 1.42 ERA (1.40 FIP) in 39 appearances for the Yankees in 2018. He has struck out 66 batters compared to 15 walks.

Nationals 5, Yankees 4: Soto’s Shots Sink Yanks in Finale

The Yankees had no solution for 19-year-old phenom Juan Soto‘s power stroke Wednesday night, as the phenom slugged two home runs to power the Nationals to a series split in the Bronx.

Sonny Gray did not have his best stuff, but battled his way through five innings on 89 pitches. The toughest pitch he threw was a 1-0 fastball to Soto in the fourth inning, which looked like a lazy fly ball to left field. But, even with its 14% Statcast hit probability, it managed to carry out over the left field wall for a go-ahead three-run shot.

Soto struck again in the seventh inning once Chasen Shreve had retired the Nats in order in his first inning of relief. Once again, a 1-0 fastball came back to haunt a Yankee pitcher. But, this home run for Soto was no wall-scraper. With an exit velocity of 111.2 mph and an estimated distance of 436 feet, it’s safe to say Soto got all of that Shreve pitch.

The Nationals got the scoring going in the first inning. Adam Eaton doubled, Trea Turner moved him to third with an infield single before Anthony Rendon hit a sacrifice fly to score Eaton. In the bottom of the first, Brett Gardner singled, stole second and moved to third on a Spencer Kieboom throwing error before Aaron Judge knocked him in with a sac fly of his own.

Greg Bird, demoted to the No. 7 spot in the lineup, smoked his third homer of the year off Nats’ spot-starter Erick Fedde in the bottom of the second. Giancarlo Stanton knocked Judge in with an RBI single in the bottom of the third to give the Yankees a 2-run lead prior to Soto’s unfortunate homer.

Gleyber Torres drilled his 12th home run of the year to lead off the fifth against Fedde, which marks a career-high for the 21-year-old. From there, however, the Yankees offense would grind to a halt. They finished the evening 1-for-7 with runners in scoring position on the evening, with the one being Stanton’s RBI single. Bird doubled to leadoff the seventh but was stranded. A Didi Gregorius walk and Stanton single were wasted in the eighth.


Some postgame notes:

  • Juan Soto and Gleyber Torres have a combined age of 41 years, 48 days, the lowest by opposing players to homer in the same game since Mike Tiernan and Egyptian Healy on May 19, 1887, per Stats by STATS (Twitter).
  • Masahiro Tanaka was sent home with an unspecified illness prior to Wednesday’s game, George A. King III of the New York Post reported (Twitter). After the game, Aaron Boone told reporters it was an inner ear infection (Twitter).
  • Sonny Gray was spotted with a “soft brace” on his right elbow, but would not say what it was for, per MLB.com’s Bryan Hoch and The Athletic‘s Marc Carig. Carig told Pinstripe Point of View that it was the first time he’d seen Gray wear it, but he “could have missed it” before. It’s something worth watching.

What’s Next:

The Tampa Bay Rays, who have won three straight but just four of their last 10, come to town for a four-game series. Lefty Blake Snell, who is breaking out in 2018, faces Domingo Germán, who is looking to settle into the No. 5 spot in the Yankees rotation now that Jordan Montgomery is out for the season.

Yankees 2, Royals 5: Yanks Out-Hit KC, But Drop Series Opener

The Yankees racked up eight hits compared to the Royals’ six, but ultimately the Bombers fell 5-to-2 behind shoddy defense in Kansas City.

The Royals jumped out to an early 1-to-0 lead in the bottom of the first. Whit Merrifield doubled, stole third and then came around to score on a fielders choice pop-up to Gleyber Torres.

Torres’ defense cost the Yankees two runs in the third too, as a fielding error allowed Merrifield to score. Starter CC Sabathia then walked Hunter Dozier with the bases loaded to force in another run. Salvador Pérez hit a solo home run off Sabathia in the fifth.

The Yankees got two runs back in the sixth, as Giancarlo Stanton led off the inning with a single, followed by a single from Aaron Hicks. Neil Walker, normally a zero against lefty pitchers, rapped a clutch RBI single to center to score Stanton. Miguel Andújar then lifted a deep sacrifice fly to score Hicks. That was all the scoring the Yankees would get.

In the seventh, David Robertson walked Mike Moustakas before allowing a double to Pérez that put the game on ice for the Royals.

Chasen Shreve and Jonathan Holder each threw one inning of scoreless relief.


Rehab Update:

  • Billy McKinney: 2-for-4, 2B
  • Greg Bird: 1-for-3, HR, BB

Each played nine innings in Double-A Trenton’s 2-to-0 victory over the Bowie Baysox.


What’s Next:

Luis Severino gets the ball for the Yankees in the middle game of the series. Lefty Danny Duffy is his counterpart. Severino has not lost in his past six starts, while Duffy yielded nine runs in 3⅓ innings against the Cleveland Indians in his last start.