Tag: Chasen Shreve

Yankees 8, Blue Jays 5: Happ Fails Audition

In what was billed by many to be a trade audition for Blue Jays lefty J.A. Happ for the Yankees, the offense ended up starring.

Happ surrendered back-to-back home runs to the game’s first batters, as Brett Gardner and Aaron Judge greeted him rudely to give the Yankees a quick 2-to-0 advantage. Happ then walked Giancarlo Stanton and Aaron Hicks. He managed to strike out Didi Gregorius and Miguel Andújar before allowing a 2-run double to Brandon Drury that just squirted over the head of a leaping Kevin Pillar.

Pillar would exact his revenge in the bottom the second off Luis Severino. After Justin Smoak led off the inning with a single, Pillar ripped a hanging slider over the left field wall for a two-run home run.

The Yankees got back into the scoring column in the following frame. Didi led off with a walk, but the next two hitters failed to advance him into scoring position. The second of which was Kyle Higashioka, who was called out on strikes with an absolutely glacial call by home-plate umpire Lance Barrett. CC Sabathia began to chirp from the dugout, and Barrett was having none of it. He warned Sabathia but gave him approximately three more words before tossing him from the dugout. Aaron Boone came out and attempted to smooth things over but it was clear Sabathia was the victim of a quick trigger.

With the ejection dealt with, Happ then walked Greg Bird. On his way to remove Happ, Jays manager John Gibbons had some words with Barrett. As Jake Petricka began his warmups, Gibbons himself took exception to some of Barrett’s decisions with the strike zone and got himself run as well. The second pitch Petricka threw ended up being rocked into the gap for a two-run triple by Gardner. The Yankee left fielder then scored on a passed ball by Luke Maile, which came on a 97 mph two-seam fastball.

In the bottom of the fourth, Randal Grichuk tagged Severino for a solo shot, marking the first time this season that the Yankees right-hander allowed more than one home run in a single game. The Jays scored again on a sacrifice fly by Pillar in the sixth, and on a garbage time Aledmys Díaz home run in the ninth off Chasen Shreve (more on this debacle later).

The Yankees became concerned in the fifth inning as center fielder Aaron Hicks was replaced in the outfield by Clint Frazier in left, with Gardner moving over to center field. The cause of this was revealed after the game as cramping in his left leg. Hicks should not have any lingering injury but will sit Sunday’s game as a precaution.

In the Yankees’ half of the ninth, Andújar smoked a double (measured at 109.6 mph) to leadoff the inning. Gregorius then followed by poking a single to left to push Andújar across as the final insurance run.

Aroldis Chapman was brought in to record the final three outs of the game, though it was a non-save situation. He only made it through six pitches, when he pulled up lame on his left leg after striking out Grichuk. Boone removed Chapman, who felt soreness in his left knee because of tendinitis that he has been dealing with all season. Shreve, who would have entered the game had the Yankees created a bigger advantage, was summoned to the mound. He worked a ground out from Maile and allowed Díaz’s eighth home run of the season before striking out pinch-hitter Teoscar Hernández to end the game.

Severino was due for an outing where he did not have his best stuff, but luckily the Yankees’ offense was ready to bail him out. The team is now hoping the injury scares for Chapman and Hicks prove to be minor. They now must play nine games in eight days in three cities before the All-Star Break arrives July 16.

What’s Next

Domingo Germán gets the nod in the series finale against the Jays and lefty Ryan Borucki.

This game was the subject of a conflict between the Yankees organization and ESPN, as the latter wanted to televise the game at 8:05 p.m. as their Sunday Night Baseball game of the week. With a doubleheader scheduled the following day in Baltimore, the Yankees cried foul, and even threatened to strip ESPN reporters of their clubhouse credentials. The network later relented, and moved the game into a 1:05 p.m. start time. The national spotlight will now be on the Los Angeles Dodgers and Los Angeles Angels Sunday night at 8 p.m. Eastern Time.

Aroldis Chapman Pulled in Ninth Inning with Apparent Leg Injury

Aroldis Chapman was removed from Saturday afternoon’s game against the Blue Jays after throwing his sixth pitch of the day.

Chapman struck out Randal Grichuk, but immediately limped after landing once the pitch was released. It appeared to be his left leg that was giving him discomfort. He was replaced by Chasen Shreve, who had been warming up alongside Chapman during the top of the ninth inning.

The YES Network broadcasting team mentioned that Chapman has managed to tendinitis in his left knee throughout his career, though it’s unclear if his left knee was giving him trouble.

Chapman is 3-0 with a 1.42 ERA (1.40 FIP) in 39 appearances for the Yankees in 2018. He has struck out 66 batters compared to 15 walks.

Nationals 5, Yankees 4: Soto’s Shots Sink Yanks in Finale

The Yankees had no solution for 19-year-old phenom Juan Soto‘s power stroke Wednesday night, as the phenom slugged two home runs to power the Nationals to a series split in the Bronx.

Sonny Gray did not have his best stuff, but battled his way through five innings on 89 pitches. The toughest pitch he threw was a 1-0 fastball to Soto in the fourth inning, which looked like a lazy fly ball to left field. But, even with its 14% Statcast hit probability, it managed to carry out over the left field wall for a go-ahead three-run shot.

Soto struck again in the seventh inning once Chasen Shreve had retired the Nats in order in his first inning of relief. Once again, a 1-0 fastball came back to haunt a Yankee pitcher. But, this home run for Soto was no wall-scraper. With an exit velocity of 111.2 mph and an estimated distance of 436 feet, it’s safe to say Soto got all of that Shreve pitch.

The Nationals got the scoring going in the first inning. Adam Eaton doubled, Trea Turner moved him to third with an infield single before Anthony Rendon hit a sacrifice fly to score Eaton. In the bottom of the first, Brett Gardner singled, stole second and moved to third on a Spencer Kieboom throwing error before Aaron Judge knocked him in with a sac fly of his own.

Greg Bird, demoted to the No. 7 spot in the lineup, smoked his third homer of the year off Nats’ spot-starter Erick Fedde in the bottom of the second. Giancarlo Stanton knocked Judge in with an RBI single in the bottom of the third to give the Yankees a 2-run lead prior to Soto’s unfortunate homer.

Gleyber Torres drilled his 12th home run of the year to lead off the fifth against Fedde, which marks a career-high for the 21-year-old. From there, however, the Yankees offense would grind to a halt. They finished the evening 1-for-7 with runners in scoring position on the evening, with the one being Stanton’s RBI single. Bird doubled to leadoff the seventh but was stranded. A Didi Gregorius walk and Stanton single were wasted in the eighth.


Some postgame notes:

  • Juan Soto and Gleyber Torres have a combined age of 41 years, 48 days, the lowest by opposing players to homer in the same game since Mike Tiernan and Egyptian Healy on May 19, 1887, per Stats by STATS (Twitter).
  • Masahiro Tanaka was sent home with an unspecified illness prior to Wednesday’s game, George A. King III of the New York Post reported (Twitter). After the game, Aaron Boone told reporters it was an inner ear infection (Twitter).
  • Sonny Gray was spotted with a “soft brace” on his right elbow, but would not say what it was for, per MLB.com’s Bryan Hoch and The Athletic‘s Marc Carig. Carig told Pinstripe Point of View that it was the first time he’d seen Gray wear it, but he “could have missed it” before. It’s something worth watching.

What’s Next:

The Tampa Bay Rays, who have won three straight but just four of their last 10, come to town for a four-game series. Lefty Blake Snell, who is breaking out in 2018, faces Domingo Germán, who is looking to settle into the No. 5 spot in the Yankees rotation now that Jordan Montgomery is out for the season.

Yankees 2, Royals 5: Yanks Out-Hit KC, But Drop Series Opener

The Yankees racked up eight hits compared to the Royals’ six, but ultimately the Bombers fell 5-to-2 behind shoddy defense in Kansas City.

The Royals jumped out to an early 1-to-0 lead in the bottom of the first. Whit Merrifield doubled, stole third and then came around to score on a fielders choice pop-up to Gleyber Torres.

Torres’ defense cost the Yankees two runs in the third too, as a fielding error allowed Merrifield to score. Starter CC Sabathia then walked Hunter Dozier with the bases loaded to force in another run. Salvador Pérez hit a solo home run off Sabathia in the fifth.

The Yankees got two runs back in the sixth, as Giancarlo Stanton led off the inning with a single, followed by a single from Aaron Hicks. Neil Walker, normally a zero against lefty pitchers, rapped a clutch RBI single to center to score Stanton. Miguel Andújar then lifted a deep sacrifice fly to score Hicks. That was all the scoring the Yankees would get.

In the seventh, David Robertson walked Mike Moustakas before allowing a double to Pérez that put the game on ice for the Royals.

Chasen Shreve and Jonathan Holder each threw one inning of scoreless relief.


Rehab Update:

  • Billy McKinney: 2-for-4, 2B
  • Greg Bird: 1-for-3, HR, BB

Each played nine innings in Double-A Trenton’s 2-to-0 victory over the Bowie Baysox.


What’s Next:

Luis Severino gets the ball for the Yankees in the middle game of the series. Lefty Danny Duffy is his counterpart. Severino has not lost in his past six starts, while Duffy yielded nine runs in 3⅓ innings against the Cleveland Indians in his last start.

Yankees 1, Braves 3: Gary’s Dinger Not Enough

Gary Sánchez hit a line drive home run off ex-Yankees RHP Arodys Vizcaíno, but it was not enough to push the Yankees to victory over the Atlanta Braves Friday in Kissimmee.

Sánchez’s second dinger of the spring came in the sixth inning, as the Yankee backstop managed to tie the game with one swing. It was his second hit of the game after he led off the fourth inning with a single to center field.

The seventh inning doomed the Yankees to defeat. Preston Tucker singled against David Hale, then Charlie Culberson singled to move Tucker to second base. Next, Carlos Franco doubled to right field, where Billy McKinney had an adventure fielding the ball. McKinney ended up committing a fielding and throwing error on the play, allowing two runs to score.

Those runs ended up making the decisive difference in the game. Only one of those runs was charged to Hale as earned.

Offensive Notes:

  • Greg Bird really struggled tonight. He struck out three times in four at-bats, leaving seven men on-base. His Spring Training average dropped below .100 after this game. Spring stats obviously mean very little, but it would be important for the Yankees to get Bird going. “I think he is a middle-of-the-order hitter on a championship team. When we see him healthy and at his best, he will be a guy who will be a real option to hit in the middle of our order,’’ Aaron Boone said to George A. King III in late February.
  • Other than Aaron Hicks‘ bloop single, Gary Sánchez provided the Yankee offense tonight with his solo home run and single. “Gary, for me, he’s one of the most gifted hitters I’ve played with, and I’ve played with some pretty decent ones, as you know,” said Brett Gardner to Coley Harvey, who now covers the Yankees for ESPN. Sánchez just renewed his contract for $620,400 in 2018 since he is still a pre-arbitration player.

Pitching Notes:

  • Sonny Gray was fantastic on the mound in his 3⅔ innings of work. He struck out three, walked one and only allowed one hit.
  • Chasen Shreve and Jonathan Holder each contributed one scoreless inning of work tonight. Each pitcher struck out two batters. Both are looking to make the Opening Day roster in the front end of the bullpen.
  • The Yankees were bested tonight by a product of their own organization. Anyelo Gómez, who was credited with the win, was selected by the Braves out of the Yankees organization in the Rule 5 draft. Roster Resource projects him to stick with the Braves in the front end of their bullpen. If he does not, the Braves must return him to the Yankees.

Tomorrow’s Game:

The Yankees welcome the Mets into Steinbrenner Field for another Subway Series preview game. The Yankees won the first edition in Port St. Lucie, and send Luis Cessa to the mound Saturday against Matt Harvey. Cessa had been scheduled to start March 7 at the Mets, but had been scratched for Domingo Germán because of a stiff neck.

Game 14: Off to Disney World

No TV, just radio tonight.

The Yankees bring their team (minus nine players) to Kissimmee tonight, taking on the Atlanta Braves inside the ESPN Wide World of Sports Complex at Walt Disney World Resort. Champion Stadium hosts a matchup between big league righties Sonny Gray and Julio Teherán.

The team continues to look at Billy McKinney, as he starts in right field tonight after his go-ahead grand slam against the Mets Wednesday. Fellow 40-man outfielder Jake Cave gets the start in left field. Gleyber Torres starts at second base, while Miguel Andújar continues his quest for the third base job.

The Yankees list RHP Jonathan Holder, LHP Chasen Shreve, RHP Tommy Kahnle, RHP J.P. Feyereisen and RHP David Hale as probable relievers against the Braves.


Braves Lineup:

  1. Ender Inciarte – CF
  2. Charlie Culberson – SS
  3. Freddie Freeman – 1B
  4. Tyler Flowers – C
  5. Nick Markakis – RF
  6. Ryan Schimpf – 3B
  7. Christian Colón – 2B
  8. Preston Tucker – LF
  9. Lane Adams – DH

Former Yankee Prospects Bañuelos, Williams Sign MiLB Deals

Two players thought to be the future of the Yankees have signed minor league deals with other teams. LHP Manny Bañuelos and OF Mason Williams have moved onto the Los Angeles Dodgers and Cincinnati Reds, respectively.

Bañuelos, traded by the Yankees to Atlanta for David Carpenter and Chasen Shreve in 2015, signed a minor league deal with the Dodgers. There is no word on whether the deal carries an invite to MLB Spring Training, but I would assume it would. Bañuelos never cracked the Big Leagues with the Yankees, appearing from 2008 to 2014 in the Yankee system. Bañuelos has a 1-4 record and a 5.13 ERA in seven MLB games. He has battled elbow problems, but made 39 appearances in 2017 with the Triple-A Salt Lake Bees of the Los Angeles Angels.

Williams signed a minor league deal with an MLB spring training invite with the Reds.  He was a top prospect who was a victim of the 2010s Yankees and their affinity for veteran players. Baseball America ranked Williams the team’s No. 1 prospect in 2012, but he did not make his MLB debut until 2015. He played just 25 total games across three seasons with the Yankees, with a respectable .281/.313/.391 slashline and strong defense at all three outfield positions. The Yankees designated Williams for assignment June 29, and he was outrighted to Triple-A after clearing waivers July 6.

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