Tag: Tommy Kahnle

White Sox 6, Yankees 2: Three Hits, Three Errors in Series-Opening Loss

THE BRONX – Monday night, the Yankees could only tally three hits and made three errors all while being unable to score even three runs as they fell in a 6-to-2 loss to the Chicago White Sox.

A Ronald Torreyes triple, Gleyber Torres two-run home run and Luke Voit single were the only knocks the Yanks could muster of a trio of White Sox pitchers. Meanwhile, on the defensive end, Voit, A.J. Cole and Shane Robinson each committed their first errors of the year, with each coming at a critical juncture.

Torreyes hit his triple in the third, but he ran on contact on a ground ball to shortstop hit by Aaron Hicks and was thrown out at the plate by Tim Anderson. Big Toe was at the center of another field rally in the seventh-inning, after leadoff walks to Torres and Neil Walker were wasted when Kyle Higashioka fouled out on a 3-1 pitch before Toe bounced into a killer 5-4-3 double play to end the inning.

Masahiro Tanaka took his fifth loss of the season, pitching seven innings on 98 pitches and allowing for earned runs on 10 hits and one walk. He recorded seven strikeouts, though his season ERA inflated to 3.97.

Tommy Kahnle made his seventh August appearance in the eighth inning, which marks his highest number of appearances in a single month this season. He recorded a scoreless inning with one strikeout. Cole, who seems to find himself working in increasingly high-leverage situations, allowed two runs (one earned) on one hit with one strikeout (unfortunately, there was a wild pitch and it allowed to run to score).

The Yankees need to win these games against bad teams like the White Sox, especially since the Red Sox are starting to hit a bit of a slide and the Yankees can gain some ground in the division. Losing happens, but it’s especially frustrating when losing happens on a night where you commit three errors against a team that came into last night’s game 28 games under .500.

What’s Next:

Lance Lynn (1-1, 3.81 ERA with NYY) looks to be a prize his stellar first start with the Yankees, which came August 6 in Chicago where he allowed just two hits and a walk through 7⅓ shutout innings. He’ll be facing well traveled veteran James Shields (5-15, 4.59 ERA), who will be making his 11th start at the new Yankee Stadium. He is 12-16 with a 4.08 ERA in 33 career starts against the Yankees.

Yankees 3, Marlins 9: Boone Waves White Flag in Blowout

We’re all feeling what Aaron Hicks is feeling in this picture.

MIAMI – Lance Lynn cruised until the bottom of the sixth inning Wednesday evening in Miami, before crumbling after being forced past 100 pitches and eventually allowing five earned runs.

After five scoreless frames, three singles and a three-run home run spelt doom for the clearly laboring Lynn, who was given the hook after 110 pitches and four runs allowed. Tommy Kahnle entered with one out and promptly allowed an RBI double to score the fifth run of the inning, which was charged to Lynn.

An RBI infield single by Giancarlo Stanton brought the Yankees to within two runs, but that’s all they got in the top of the seventh-inning off of Marlins relievers Adam Conley and Tayron Guerrero. This slight deficit led to one of the most confusing decisions made by Aaron Boone all season.

Boone called upon Chance Adams as a long-reliever in the bottom of the seventh, forcing a 24-year-old rookie into a role he has not filled in close to two full seasons. Adams had been called up earlier Wednesday to replace the injured Aroldis Chapman, who had gone on the disabled list with tendinitis in his left knee. Things didn’t go great for Adams in his 1⅔ innings, where he allowed four runs (three earned) on four hits and three walks. He did not record a single strike out, and his ERA in the major leagues skyrocketed to 8.10. By the time A.J. Cole was called in to rescue the Yanks, they were already down by six.

What Boone said after the game was frustrating to many Yankee fans: he would’ve gone to Chad Green if the Yankees were only down by one. That’s right, the Yankees manager decided to wave the white flag to the Miami Marlins down by two. It might’ve been the product of scoreboard watching, since both of the teams competing for the lead in the wildcard standings (Oakland Athletics and Seattle Mariners) both lost Wednesday night. Still, the decision to go from one of your better high-leverage relievers in favor of the guy who was supposed to start for your Triple-A affiliate just hours earlier is kind of baffling.

Oh, well. It feels incredibly frustrating but the reality is that the Yankees didn’t gain or lose ground in the wild-card race anyway.

What’s Next:

The Yankees head to Baltimore for a four-game series (of course it includes a doubleheader) starting Friday night with the return of CC Sabathia from the disabled list, who was inactive for 11 days because of right knee inflammation. He’ll face off against right-hander Alex Cobb in the series opener, who has a 1.55 ERA in his last four starts (which includes his August 1 win over the Yankees at Yankee Stadium).

It’s Players’ Weekend when the Yanks are in Baltimore, so expect those uniforms with nicknames on the back as well as some flashy equipment since MLB is holding their uniform and equipment rules in abeyance for now.

Chapman Placed on DL; Adams Recalled; Rabago Claimed

The Yankees placed closer Aroldis Chapman on the 10-day disabled list today, and recalled righty Chance Adams from Triple-A to take his roster spot. The Yanks claimed catcher Chris Rabago from the Colorado Rockies and optioned him to Double-A Trenton.

Chapman had been pitching through tendinitis in his left knee all season, but had been able to manage it himself. He told reporters after the game Tuesday that the pain he felt was worse than usual. He threw just six pitches in his appearance in the 12th inning before summoning the trainer from the dugout. He was relieved by Tommy Kahnle, who got the save 17 pitches later. Chapman is 3-0 with a 2.11 ERA in 50 appearances. He is 31-for-33 in save attempts.

Adams will serve as a long-relief option for the Yankees tonight in Miami, and will be one of the options (along with Luis Cessa and Sonny Gray) to start in Saturday’s doubleheader in Baltimore. The Yanks No. 13 prospect, he made his MLB debut August 4 in Boston, allowing three runs on three hits in five innings of work.

Rabago was the Rockies’ 13th round pick in the 2014 draft. In 66 games for the Double-A Hartford Yard Goats, he was hitting .213/.292/.361 with four home runs and 23 RBI. The Yankees will likely recall Rabago to be the third catcher September 1 until Gary Sánchez returns from his rehab assignment.

Domingo Acevedo Promoted From Double-A

One Domingo replaces the other Domingo.

The Yankees have recalled No. 7 prospect Domingo Acevedo to be in the bullpen for today’s game with the Mets. Last night, Pinstriped Prospects’ Robert Pimpsner alluded to Acevedo’s promotion and The Athletic’s Robert Murray confirmed it this morning.

Acevedo takes the spot of Domingo Germán, who was optioned Friday night after another disappointing start. The righty is 6’7″, 250-pounds and began the season with Double-A Trenton. He was added to the 40-man roster in the offseason, but did not pitch in MLB Spring Training because he was coming off of a career-high 133.0 innings pitched across High-A, Double-A and Triple-A in 2017.

So far, the results have been solid for Acevedo in the Eastern League. In 11 games (eight starts, 50⅔ innings) he has a 2-2 record and a 2.84 ERA (3.32 FIP) with 40 strikeouts to 18 walks. Batters have hit just .209 against him and he carries a 40.6% ground ball rate so far on the year.

MLB Pipeline’s scouting report is as follows:

Acevedo’s fastball has been clocked as high as 103 mph, though he usually works from 93-97 mph as a starter, which is even tougher to hit because of the funkiness and angle his 6-foot-7 frame and low three-quarters arm slot create. That slot makes it tough for him to stay on top of his mid-80s slider, which may never be more than an average offering. He compensates with a plus changeup that he locates well and is effective against both left-handers and right-handers.

For an extra-large guy with a lot of velocity, Acevedo throws a surprising amount of strikes. His delivery isn’t smooth and features effort, yet he somehow makes it work and finally proved he could hold up over a full season in 2017. Some scouts aren’t convinced he’ll hold up for a starter, though he’d still have plenty of value as a high-leverage option should he become a reliever.

Acevedo got the call over the other two healthy arms on the Yankees 40-man roster, which are Giovanny Gallegos and Tommy Kahnle. He is the second Yankee to get the call directly from Double-A, as fellow righty Jonathan Loáisiga was promoted to make four starts in June.

Mets 7, Yankees 5: RISPfails Mar Start of Second Half

Another loss to a sub-.500 team.

NEW YORK – The Yankees went 2-for-13 with runners in scoring position and it doomed them to a 7-to-5 loss in the second-half opener Friday night at Yankee Stadium.

The Yankees collected 14 hits, and left 14 men on base in a loss that proved beyond frustrating. Gary Sánchez collected one hit in his debut off of the disabled list, but left six men on base. Aaron Hicks and Miguel Andújar each left five men on base. It seemed like the right hits just would never come.

Embed from Getty Images

First-inning Domingo Germán buried the Yanks early. Asdrúbal Cabrera doubled in a leadoff walk to Brandon Nimmo and Michael Conforto later doubled to score Cabrera. José Bautista then doubled to score Conforto. The Mets recorded 10 hits, and did not record their first single until Conforto singled to score run No. 5 in the fifth inning.

The Yankees scored one in the third on a Giancarlo Stanton sacrifice fly, and two in the sixth on an RBI double by Neil Walker. Two more came across in the eighth on a Didi Gregorius double and Stanton groundout. Noah Syndergaard, the Mets starter, bent multiple times but did not break in his five innings of work. The Mets ran with Robert Gsellman in the ninth inning as reports trickled out that the Mets were close to a deal with an unknown team for closer Jeurys Familia. Gsellman worked around a two-out walk to retire the Yankees. Per multiple sources, the Mets are close to dealing Familia to the Oakland Athletics. At the time of publication, a deal was not confirmed.

Embed from Getty Images

After the game, the Yankees announced Domingo Germán had been optioned and that Luis Cessa will take over his spot in the rotation. Cessa is on turn to start July 25 in Tampa Bay. No word on who replaces Germán tomorrow, though the likely option is a 40-man reliever like Giovanny Gallegos or Tommy Kahnle.

What’s Next:

Sonny Gray looks to build on a promising last start in Baltimore against Steven Matz in a Saturday matinée in the Bronx.

Erik Kratz Traded to Brewers; Adam Lind Released

The Yankees made two minor league moves Friday afternoon, trading Triple-A catcher Erik Kratz to the Brewers and releasing 1B/OF Adam Lind. The Yankees signed utility man Wilkin Castillo, primarily a catcher, out of the independent Atlantic League yesterday likely knowing Kratz would be dealt today.

Kratz, 37, came to the Yankees in exchange for cash considerations ahead of the September 1 roster expansion date in 2017. His acquisition came at a time where the Yankees needed catching depth because of looming suspensions to both Austin Romine and Gary Sánchez. Kratz went 2-for-2 with a double and two RBIs in four appearances for the Yankees. This season in Triple-A, he was hitting .269/.356/.538 with four home runs and six RBIs in the International League. The Brewers selected Kratz to their 25-man active roster today.

Lind was released as the Yankees await the return of Greg Bird to the everyday lineup. This all but confirms that Tyler Austin will be demoted to Triple-A when Bird is officially activated Saturday. Lind was hitting .241/.302/.414 with one home run and seven RBIs in eight games prior to his release. The minor league contract he signed contained an opt-out for June 1, and the Yankees gave him a head-start on his free agency with this release.

Castillo was with the Yankees in 2017, though only in minor league duty. The 33-year-old is a switch-hitter, and has appeared at every position except for center field in his minor league career. Between Double-A Trenton and Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre last year, he slashed .196/.243/.286 with three home runs and 13 RBIs. He’s there to play defense and give the other minor leaguers a breather every once in a while. Castillo was hitting .314/.400/.486 through 20 games with the Long Island Ducks of the Atlantic League.


The Yankees activated RHP Tommy Kahnle from the 10-day disabled list prior to Friday’s series opener against the Los Angeles Angels.

Tommy Kahnle to Return Friday; Greg Bird on Saturday

Badly needed reinforcements are headed to the Bronx, as key contributors RHP Tommy Kahnle and 1B Greg Bird are set to be activated from the disabled list during the upcoming series against the Los Angeles Angels. Manager Aaron Boone provided the information in a radio interview with Mike Francesa.

The bullpen proved overworked in an ugly loss Wednesday in Texas, where the Yankees’ offense scored 10 runs but were bested by 12 from the Rangers. Tommy Kahnle will provide extra length as he serves as another arm Boone can trust in a high-leverage situation. Kahnle last pitched April 12 in Boston, before a concerning velocity drop led the Yankees to discover his right shoulder tendinitis. That likely explains his unsightly 6.14 ERA (5.69 FIP) as well as astronomical 9.8 walks-per-nine rate. So far on his rehab assignment, Kahnle has allowed two earned runs in five innings of work.

Greg Bird returns to a first base position that has actually been handled well in his absence. The 25-year-old did not make the trip north for the Yankees’ opening series in Toronto due to another surgery on a small bone spur in his right ankle. Doctors removed a coin-sized calcium deposit from the joint. Yankees first basemen have combined to hit .238/.296/.431 with nine homers and 33 RBIs to this point in the season, so they have the luxury to ease Bird back into things. I would expect the Yankees to demote an extra reliever (likely A.J. Cole) so that they can keep both Tyler Austin and Neil Walker on the active roster. On his rehab assignment, Bird has slashed .205/.367/.436 with three home runs. He likely will play one more game with the RailRiders Friday in Scranton.


Gary Sánchez, who left Tuesday night’s game with calf cramps and did not start in Wednesday’s game, will likely start behind the plate as normal to catch Luis Severino in Friday’s series opener. He’ll get at least the half-day-off Saturday as Sonny Gray will start.

Prior to Boone’s interview with Francesa, there was nervousness regarding Sánchez’s health as the team signed catcher Wilkin Castillo out of the independent Atlantic League and assigned him to Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre. No word at this point if either of their catchers, Kyle Higashioka or Erik Kratz, are going through any injury issues. Castillo is actually quite versatile as well, logging innings at first base, second base, third base, shortstop, left field and right field. And, yes, he logged 6⅔ innings on the mound for the Triple-A Indianapolis Indians in the Pittsburgh Pirates system in 2015.

Earlier today, the Yankees activated outfielder Billy McKinney (left shoulder sprain) from the 10-day disabled list and optioned him to Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre.