Tag: Tyler Wade

Yankees Claim Hanser Alberto Off Waivers From Texas

The 26-year-old joins the Yanks as infield depth.

The Rangers tried to sneak out-of-options infielder Hanser Alberto through outright waivers, but failed as the Yankees pounced with a waiver claim on the 26-year-old. Alberto is hitting .381/.435/.548 in his first 11 games for the Gigantes del Cibao of the Dominican Winter League.

In parts of three seasons with the Rangers, Alberto hit .192/.210/.231 (9 wRC+) with defensive appearances at all four infield positions. It’s an ugly stat-line, but he did manage to hit .330/.346/.452 (106 wRC+) with seven homers and 58 RBIs for Triple-A Round Rock Express in 2018.

This move adds infield depth to the Yankees on the heels of Didi Gregorius‘s recent Tommy John surgery. Alberto is regarded as a strong defender, relatively young and cheap. I have a feeling the Yankees will try to sneak Alberto through outright waivers between now and the beginning of Spring Training. The team could use some veteran infield depth in the upper levels of the minor leagues.

At Triple-A, the Yankees are at risk of losing Rey Navarro and Gio Urshela to minor league free agency. Miguel Andújar and Gleyber Torres appear to be anchored in the major leagues, and Ronald Torreyes and Tyler Wade appear to have the inside track for bench roles in the big leagues. If Alberto does make it through the winter in the Yankees organization, he’ll compete for the utility infield bench spot and for a starting role with the Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre RailRiders.

Alberto has been added to the Yankees 40-man roster, which now sits at 37 players.

Yankees Agree With Brett Gardner on One-Year, $7.5 Million Deal After Declining Option

The longest-tenured Yankee will be back in pinstripes in 2019.

The longest-tenured member of the Yankees will be back in pinstripes for 2019, as the team announced they have agreed to terms with Brett Gardner after declining his $12.5 million club option for the 2019 season. He will be paid a $2 million buyout since the team declined his option.

“I wasn’t sure what to expect at the end of the season,” Gardner told MLB.com, “but being able to come back and rejoin this special group of guys we have in place, continue my career in a Yankees uniform — and hopefully finish it in a Yankees uniform — it means a great deal to me.

Mark Feinsand of MLB.com reported on Twitter that Gardner will earn $7.5 million in 2019. At the moment, it is unclear if he will earn any incentives for playing time or other milestones. The 35-year-old hit .236/.322/.368 (90 wRC+) with 12 home runs and 45 RBIs in the final guaranteed year of the contract he signed with the Yankees in 2014. He saw his playing time shrink down the stretch as he fatigued yet again in the second half as the team swung a last-minute trade for Andrew McCutchen from the San Francisco Giants.

Gardner went 0-for-8 with three walks in five postseason games for the Yankees in 2018. He started in center field for Game 2 and Game 3 of the American League Division Series against Boston.

Gardner technically will get $9.5 million because of the buyout, but the team will only face a $7.5 million luxury tax hit because the buyout quantity was guaranteed to be paid from the last contract. Therefore, it was in the average annual value of the old contract as a sunken cost.

With free agency beginning in earnest Friday evening, it’s important to look at Gardner’s role for the 2019 season. I get the feeling that he won’t be a full-time player. Gardner’s abilities as a defender, baserunner and veteran leader can certainly help this team be better next year. Aaron Boone can also manage his workload to avoid the second-half burn out that we often see from him.

“We have some unfinished business. It was tough to sit back and watch the rest of the postseason this year,” Gardner said to MLB.com. “It was a great learning experience for us. We have a young team and had a great season, but we came up short of our goal.”

The most important part of this move is that it reinforces the once formidable outfield depth in New York. The 2018 Yankees got outfield appearances from Jace Peterson, Shane Robinson, Tyler Wade and Neil Walker because of injuries and trades. The team really can’t rely on Jacoby Ellsbury and Clint Frazier because of their injury histories. Top prospect outfielder Estevan Florial needs more development, and depth guys like Ryan McBroom, Mark Payton and Zack Zehner probably aren’t options yet. Who does that leave? Gardner, Aaron Hicks, Aaron Judge and Giancarlo Stanton. That’s a pretty solid starting outfield.

But, then again, the Yankees had a similar situation in 2017 and swung a trade for Stanton. This team could still go out and make a big splash for someone like Michael Brantley or Bryce Harper. Point is, the Yankees got caught with their pants down when all of their outfield depth suddenly dried up in 2018. I think this is a smart baseball move for a team with more additions to make before Spring Training opens in February.

Aaron Hicks Exits ALDS Game One With Right Hamstring Tightness

Hicks was the third most valuable Yankee in the 2018 regular season, per Fangraphs.

Just moments after Aaron Hicks smacked the Yankees’ second hit of the game against Boston in ALDS Game One, the Yankee center fielder pulled up lame on his jog to first base. The Yankees announced the injury was right hamstring tightness, and that Hicks was undergoing further evaluation.

Hicks was replaced by pinch-runner Brett Gardner, who also took over defensive duties in center field. Hicks had missed three of four games in a September series in Tampa Bay because of soreness in his left hamstring.

Aaron Boone said before the game that Tyler Wade (along with Kyle Higashioka and Luis Cessa) is working out at the Yankee facility in Tampa in case of injury, and he would likely replace Hicks on the roster if he were unable to come back. The problem there is that Hicks would be ineligible for the ALCS should the Yankees replace him and then advance past the Red Sox.

This is a developing story, and will be updated as news breaks.

Yankees Announce Wild Card Roster

The Yankees have announced their Wild Card roster.

Pitchers

  • Dellin Betances – 68
  • Zach Britton – 53
  • Aroldis Chapman – 54
  • Chad Green – 57
  • J.A. Happ – 34
  • Jonathan Holder – 56
  • Lance Lynn – 36
  • David Robertson – 30
  • Luis Severino – 40
  • Masahiro Tanaka – 19

Catchers

  • Kyle Higashioka – 66
  • Austin Romine – 28
  • Gary Sánchez – 24

Infielders

  • Miguel Andújar – 41
  • Didi Gregorius – 18
  • Adeiny Hechavarría – 29
  • Gleyber Torrres – 25
  • Luke Voit – 45
  • Tyler Wade – 12
  • Neil Walker – 14

Outfielders

  • Brett Gardner – 11
  • Aaron Hicks – 31
  • Aaron Judge – 99
  • Andrew McCutchen – 26
  • Giancarlo Stanton – 27

Yankees Acquire Hechavarría From Pirates; Designate Bollinger for Assignment

More infield depth for the Bombers.

The Yanks added infield insurance just before the 11:59 p.m. Eastern deadline for postseason eligibility, acquiring defensive stud Adeiny Hechavarría from the Pittsburgh Pirates (with cash considerations) in exchange for a player to be named later or cash considerations.

Just about all of Hechavarría’s value comes from his glove, as he owns a meager .254/.287/.342 (69 wRC+) batting line across 76 games with Tampa Bay and Pittsburgh in 2018. The Pirates acquired him August 6 for a minor-league pitcher after Tampa Bay designated him for assignment August 1.

In 625⅓ innings at shortstop in 2018, Hechavarría has totaled +3 defensive runs saved and owns a +1.5 UZR. He has just three fielding errors this season, and five total at shortstop over the past two years. He also has 70⅔ innings of experience at second base, and 156 innings at third base. However, he has played exclusively shortstop since moving from Toronto to Miami in their mega-deal in November 2012.

Embed from Getty Images

In my opinion, this deal is simply a way to improve infield defense now that rosters have expanded to 40 players. Hechavarría is definitely not the kind of move you make to cover up a setback to Didi Gregorius‘ heel bruise, but it’s a move that allows for plenty of quality infield depth. It also seems to indicate that Gio Urshela will remain with the RailRiders through their playoff push. It’s worth noting that Hechavarría has a .299/.319/.418 (99 wRC+) line in his career at Yankee Stadium, though that just seems to be one of those crazy baseball quirks.

The Yankees will now have a surplus of utility infielders, as Hechavarría will join Ronald Torreyes, Tyler Wade and Neil Walker as options off the bench.


It seems the Yanks are trying to push Ryan Bollinger off the 40-man roster for a second time, having outrighted him May 27 after a one day appearance on the active roster. He was added again July 31, though he was optioned to the minors the next day. I believe he can elect free agency in lieu of another outright assignment, though the Yankees will try to sneak him through waivers after designating him for assignment.

Adler: Giancarlo Stanton Playing Through Left Hamstring Tightness

With Aaron Judge and Gary Sánchez sidelined with wrist and groin injuries, respectively, another Yankees slugger is dealing with an ailment of his own. Lindsey Adler of The Athletic reported Monday morning that Giancarlo Stanton was limited to being the designated hitter in the final two games in Boston because of tightness in his left hamstring.

From Adler’s piece:

“Stanton is dealing with tightness in his left hamstring and has had it wrapped up with ice after games Friday, Saturday and Sunday night. Presumably, with Aaron Judge and Gary Sánchez already on the disabled list, Boone has not wanted to take the risk of losing his final power bat as any chance at winning the division to avoid the one-game wild-card berth slips further away.”

An injury to Stanton would explain the seemingly inexplicable use of Shane Robinson in two out of four games in Boston. With Judge injured and Tyler Wade on optional assignment in Triple-A, Robinson is the only available outfielder for the Yankees. Clint Frazier is in Tampa working his way back from post-concussion migraines, and the Yankees traded away options like Tyler Austin and Billy McKinney at the deadline. Another option would be Ronald Torreyes, who has 187 outfield innings (including 90.0 in center in 2014) combined between the minors and majors.

Neil Walker has played three innings of right field basically out of necessity for the Yankees, marking his first time outside of the infield in his professional career. Walker’s bat is clearly superior to Robinson’s, but the Yankees felt it was necessary to have a natural outfielder patrolling right at Fenway. Robinson went 0-for-4 with a walk and a sacrifice bunt in his two starts against the Red Sox.

The truth is that the Yankees don’t have much outfield depth left after the trades they made last week. Top prospect Estevan Florial is not MLB-ready, especially after missing seven weeks with a wrist injury. Ryan McBroom and Mark Payton are the other outfielders worth keeping an eye on at Triple-A, while Wade has started three consecutive games in the corner outfield in SWB as well.

Stanton likely will attempt to play through the soreness, especially with the aforementioned lack of power bats. But, it likely means we’ll see a lot more of Robinson in right field until Stanton is 100 percent.

Luis Cessa, Luke Voit Promoted; Happ to DL; Wade Optioned

Not #HugWatch, but some post-July roster intrigue.

UPDATE (August 2 at 4:00 p.m. EDT): Luis Cessa and Luke Voit have officially been promoted. J.A. Happ has been placed on the 10-day D.L. (retroactive to July 30) with hand, foot and mouth disease. Tyler Wade has been optioned to Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre.

Cessa will wear his usual No. 85 while Voit will take Chasen Shreve’s old No. 45.


The Yankees will have two RailRiders in uniform tomorrow night in the form of righty Luis Cessa and first baseman Luke Voit, according to DJ Eberle of Wilkes-Barre’s Times-Leader.

So far, there’s no hints about a counter-move, but there are some guesses that can be made. There is a pitcher headed to the disabled list because Cessa has not been down for the requisite 10 days before being recalled. It could be J.A. Happ, who recently was diagnosed with hand, foot and mouth disease.

But, that’s not necessarily the case since recalling Cessa this early would imply he would pitch before Saturday. Cessa told Eberle he has not been told his role yet, whether it comes as a starter or reliever. That makes me think he’s not Happ insurance, especially since they’re calling him up so early. Sonny Gray might have some “shoulder inflammation” or something they can use to sit him down for an extended period of time in an effort to get him right. Who knows; time will tell.

Luke Voit is going to be a bat off the bench and will likely start at least one game at first base against one of the tough Sox lefties. He was just acquired from the St. Lous Cardinals for Giovanny Gallegos and Chasen Shreve. In his MLB career, he has a .263/.282/.553 line with three homers against lefties in 39 plate appearances.

Voit will be replacing one of Tyler Wade or Shane Robinson, who are the two non-catcher bench players with the Yankees at the moment. I’d imagine Wade stays because of his defensive versatility because Robinson is exclusively an outfielder. Time will tell there as well.

%d bloggers like this: